Farfalle and black bean salad, a recipe

One of the dishes I absolutely love to make, whether for a family reunion, a dinner with friends, or an office party (back in the day when I worked in a corporation) is a huge batch of pasta salad. It’s easy to make, cheap, and nutritious. It’s also a great way to sneak healthy food into your loved ones’ tummies! Who would’ve thought that pasta salads can be healthy, huh.

Most pasta salads out there are made with mayonnaise. Folks, let me tell you right now, mayonnaise does not do a body any good. Especially store bought mayonnaise. “Natural flavors”? “Calcium disodium EDTA”? Homemade mayonnaise entails using uncooked egg yolks. I personally would not like to endanger anyone’s health by risking to feed them salmonella, but that’s just me.

Try making a very fresh tasting pasta and bean salad which will win anyone. No need to label it as “vegan”, or “healthy”. Just feed it to them. They will eat it.

farfalle and black bean salad

Beans are so good for you — they are a cheap source of protein and fiber, and fight against cholesterol and heart disease. In this recipe I use a basic calamansi vinaigrette which marries well with basil. A bonus to using a vinaigrette over mayonnaise? You can bring this to a potluck and it can sit for a couple of hours in room temperature, and you won’t risk food poisoning.

This recipe will cost about P30-40 per serving. For real.

Marie

Farfalle and black bean salad

Makes 8 to 10 servings

Nut-free, soy-free, gluten-free option

Ingredients
1 bag, 250g dried black beans / black sitaw, cooked
1 bag, 500g farfalle / bow-tie pasta, cooked
1 bag, 1kg calamansi, juiced
1 head garlic, grated or chopped finely
½ to ¾ c. vegetable oil – extra virgin olive or combination of olive and canola
1 ½ kg tomatoes, seeded and chopped finely
1 large yellow bell pepper (optional), seeded and chopped finely
1 head onion, chopped finely
1 bag, 100g basil, chiffonaded
Salt and pepper to taste
Additional calamansi juice or vinegar to taste, such as cane, balsamic, or red wine

  1. Place the pasta in a large salad bowl. Combine the calamansi juice and garlic; add half of this mixture to the pasta. Drizzle in the vegetable oil – the amount is up to you. Add enough to lubricate the pasta, about ½ to ¾ cup. Toss to coat. The pasta may seem sticky because of the starch, but just be patient with it. The dressing will loosen it up.
  2. Add in the black beans, tomatoes, bell pepper, and onion. Add the remaining half of the calamansi-garlic mixture as well as salt and pepper. Toss to coat.
  3. Add the basil to the salad and toss. Taste and if needed, season with more salt and pepper. If the dressing seems to be lacking, add more calamansi juice or vinegar.
Suggestions
  1. Serve the pasta in a large bowl and top with a basil branch.
  2. This pasta is perfect for potlucks because heating it up is not an issue. This can be served cold or room temperature.
  3. Make it gluten-free: use rice or quinoa pasta, available at Healthy Options. Most supermarkets carry rice noodles from Thailand — you can experiment with these but they toughen up when cold. I would suggest serving the salad warm or room temperature if you want to use Thai rice noodles.

Farfalle and black bean salad

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15 Comments

Filed under Pasta, Recipe, Salad

15 responses to “Farfalle and black bean salad, a recipe

  1. Joanne

    Thank you for posting this lovely recipe! where can we buy the black sitaw beans?
    Joanne

    • kitchenrevolution

      Hi Joanne, you can find black beans in most supermarkets and they are sold as “black sitaw”. In the Alabang area, you can find black beans in Makati Supermarket and Shopwise. Try Rustan’s, Shopwise, and maybe Save More.

  2. Pingback: Vegetarian in social situations: being a guest | Kitchen Revolution

  3. louie

    where can i buy quinoa? is it available in shopwise or healthy options?

  4. mayabesa

    Would love to try this, thinking of brown/red rice instead of pasta. Wanted to know: you call for “black sitaw, cooked”– have never worked with black sitaw before, how does one cook it for this recipe?

    • kitchenrevolution

      Black sitaw = black beans! In grocery stores it is sometimes labeled as ‘black sitaw’. To cook: soak them in water for 8-12 hours; drain, bring to a boil in fresh water with salt; lower heat and simmer for 45 min to 1 1/2 hrs. Time would depend on how long beans are soaked and their age. Happy cooking!

      • mayabesa

        Thanks a lot! I also picked up a bag of ‘white sitaw’– is it treated the same way, can be used much like (interchangeably with) the black sitaw?

      • kitchenrevolution

        White sitaw = black eyed peas! They will come out slightly softer than the black beans when cooked. They might not look as pretty when substituted in this dish (black beans + other colors of the veggies are quite striking) but they can stand in for black beans in a pinch.

  5. mayabesa

    Cool, had no idea they were black eyed peas! Now my husband wants to put up a band called White Sitaw 🙂 Thanks for all your help.

  6. cezgolez

    Hi! Can you reco any other substitute for the beans? I have friends whose joints hurt after eating them. Thanks!

    • kitchenrevolution

      You may leave the beans out no problem, just add more vegetables. Or grill up some tofu and add that in instead!

      Just to let you know, aching joints from eating beans is a symptom of gout / high uric acid which is caused by an acidic diet of meat, refined carbs, white sugar, and no exercise. Gout can be reversed by adopting a more plant-based diet 🙂

  7. My family all the time say that I am killing my time here at net, however I know I am getting familiarity everyday by reading such fastidious articles.

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